Review: Terminal Point by Bruce Zick

Love time travel, quirky love relationships, and atomic steam punk? Then the reissue of Bruce Zick’s Terminal Point is a must have. Terminal Point was first published in 1993 by Dark Horse Comics, Caliber Comics has since brought back this classic in all of its DuoShade glory and has just recently released  it as a graphic novel.

Set in 1993, Terminal Point documents the adventures of Pilot, a web runner employed by a secret agency called Terminus. Pilot rides a  time traveling vehicle called Equus. Together they set up terminal points for Terminus. Terminal points are points used by Terminus to allow the corporation to control time itself. They place beacons in territories they don’t own. Some of the terminal points come at a cost however, much to the disadvantage of the natives who already settling the land. Things begin to unravel for Pilot when negotiations with a group of indigenous people go horribly awry. 

After traveling back in time seeking safety,  Pilot comes in contact with the aluring and velvet toned Byrnn Stone. She’s the vocalist at the Silver Crescent Club. She is also the  girlfriend of Robert Rhodes, a freakin’ genius inventor whose inventions get a major puch in the boost deprtment when he’s exposed to tech from the future. A budding love triangle develops as Byrnn is caught between Rhodes and her new found feelings for Pilot. Tensions escalate between Pilot and Rhodes as Terminus close in on the rogue web runner. Apparently Pilot isn’t all that he appears to be.  

Zick’s art is very detailed with his line work and I love the Duo-Shade process for adding tones to his drawings making ther pop. Even with  advances in the production process, Zick’s art looks as it was originally intended with that the film noior feel. The steampunk designs give Terminal Point an awesome look and it’s a great visual fit to his previous work, The Zone Continuum. Perhaps Zick will be given the chance marry the two narratives together one day.

Terminal Point is an entertaining to read and is still fresh 20 plus years after it’s original release.